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Do you really need to take vitamins and minerals?

Do you really need to take vitamins and minerals?

Medical MV Tablets (Medical multivitamin and mineral tablets)

Medical MV tablets may be a useful dietary supplement for those who wish to consume the essential nutrients for optimal health

We have never acquired enough vitamins and minerals from food.  Until the government mandated “enriched” foods we saw scurvy, rickets, and a neurological disease called Beriberi.  We wrongfully assumed we were getting enough supplementation until Harvard and other research institutions found otherwise.  We now know that we are NOT being supplemented with enough.  We need optimum levels not rock bottom levels which is what the RDA has always been—the lowest amount needed not to develop scurvy etc.  The American Medical Association now recommends that we all need a supplement.  But we must be careful, cheap vitamins can slowly kill you.  Most companies put in lots of the cheap stuff and very little of the good stuff.  They don’t tell you that the vitamin E they use is from petroleum and causes health problems.  The list goes on and on.  Many vitamin companies don’t tell you they have near toxic levels of some fat soluble vitamins because they are cheap, but they skimp on the essential minerals and many of the water soluble vitamins. 

Some people have said that vitamins just make expensive urine, but according to research this is just not so.  The reason someone’s urine may look more yellow is because some vitamins like B12 are rich in color.  Other vitamins like Vitamin D3 is white and won’t change the color of urine a bit.  Think of it like rich colored red beats from the garden.   If you eat enough red beats it will likely change the color of your urine, but that doesn’t mean you’re not getting any nutrition from them. Bottom line, vitamins do NOT just make expensive urine.  Studies prove that with the right supplementation of quality absorbable vitamins and minerals your body can get the nutrients it needs.

Studies show that a high percentage of adults in North America and other developed areas eat less than the minimum daily allowance of 10 or more essential nutrients. Adequate amounts and proper balance of these nutrients are needed not only for maintaining good health, but also for the dietary management of the body’s structure as well as the optimum functioning of its various systems, including the immune and gastrointestinal systems.

Medical MV Tablets have been carefully developed to contain the right proportions of vitamins, minerals, trace elements, and other nutrients without danger of toxic build-up or other side effects. Each ingredient is selected in consideration of its absorbability, competitive relationship with other nutrients, allergenic potential, and long-term safety. Certain nutrients such as beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, and B-complex vitamins are included in high-potency amounts because of the vital roles they play in antioxidant protection, energy production, the maintenance of healthy blood cells, the nervous system, hormonal balance, and more. Minerals and trace elements are provided in their safest and most bioavailable forms.

Medical MV Tablets includes important plant “phytonutrients”, there are so many they haven’t all been named. Medical MV Tablets have greens and several varieties of microalgae  that supply chlorophyll, carotenes, B-vitamins, and trace elements. Fruits and vegetables in powder form provide naturally occurring nutrients and antioxidants to help fight free radical damage and support cellular health. Cruciferous vegetables, broccoli and cauliflower, offer protective sulforophane compounds known for their ability to induce protective phase 2 liver detoxifying enzymes.Lutein, lycopene, and zeaxanthinare carotenoid antioxidants known for ocular health and other healthy aging parameters. Enzymes such as betaine and bromelain aid in digestion of foods and contribute to healthy inflammatory levels within the body. Bioflavanoids (including hesperidin and rutin) and proanthocyanidins support and enhance the activity of vitamin C, and are known for their ability to help support the health of the body’s capillary system and connective tissues.

Medical MV Tablets contains Metafolin®, a patented, natural form of folate has a big name “(6S) 5-ethyltetrahydrofolate” or (5-MTHF). 5-MTHF is the naturally occurring, predominant form of folate commonly found in cells and is essential for overall health, as it participates as a cofactor in a reaction that involves the remethylation of bad acting homocysteine to methionine. Unlike synthetic folic acid, 5-MTHF can be used directly by the body, without the need for an additional conversion via the enzyme (5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)). In certain populations, the body’s ability to convert folic acid to 5-MTHF by use of this enzyme may be compromised due to genetic differences. Metafolin® contains only the S isomer of 5-MTHF and has been shown to be the only form of folate to be able to cross the blood-brain barrier.

Additional vitamin D3 (also known as cholecalciferol) has been added to this formula as numerous scientists now feel that supplementation with vitamin D at levels greater than previously thought necessary is critical to helping maintain overall health.

Medical MV Tablets have essential nutrition for optimal health with an organic fruit/vegetable blend.  These tablets have officially been ranked the number one medical grade vitamin in the United States and Canada.

Forget the gummy bear vitamins, you’d be better off eating a gummy bear and swallowing a vitamin that has what your body needs.  No vitamin containing whole food can be squished into one pill, even though the water has been taken out food will only compress so far.  Thus you’ll notice you can take up to eight pills a day.  We recommend up to four pills twice a day.

Please note the titles of the research listed below they are very important milestones in vitamin research.

SUGGESTED USE

Adults may take 2 tablets twice daily with food or as directed by a healthcare professional.  Your health care provider may recommend up to 4 tablets twice a day especially if you are sick, an athlete, or have a poor diet. This product is best taken with meals in divided doses, such as 4 tablets with 2 largest meals of the day.  If you take this dose please do so under a health care providers instruction.  The maximum dose we authorize through this site is 2 pills twice a day or 4 pills at once.

SIDE EFFECTS

No adverse effects have been reported.

STORAGE

Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct light. Keep out of reach of children.

REFERENCES

  • Giovannucci E, Stampfer MJ, Colditz GA, et al. Multivitamin use, folate, and colon cancer in women in the Nurses’ Health Study [see comments]. Ann Intern Med 1998;129:517-24.
  • Hughes DA. Effects of dietary antioxidants on the immune function of middle- aged adults. Proc Nutr Soc 1999;58:79-84.
  • Johnson K, Kligman EW. Preventive nutrition: an ‘optimal’ diet for older adul ts. Geriatrics 1992;47:56-60.
  • Kelly GS. Nutritional and botanical interventions to assist with the adaptation to stress. Altern Med Rev 1999;4:249-65.
  • Miranda MS, Cintra RG, Barros SB, et al. Antioxidant activity of the microalga Spirulina maxima. Braz J Med Biol Res 1998;31:1075-9.
  • Mukhtar H, Ahmad N. Tea polyphenols: prevention of cancer and optimizing health. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;71:1698S-1702S.
  • Prior RL, Cao G. Antioxidant capacity and polyphenolic components of teas: implications for altering in vivo antioxidant status. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1999;220:255-61. Shobana S, Naidu KA. Antioxidant activity of selected Indian spices . Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 2000;62:107-10.
  • van Poppel G, Verhoeven DT, Verhagen H, et al. Brassica vegetab les and cancer prevention. Epidemiology and mechanisms. Adv Exp Med Biol 1999;472:159-68.
  • Weisburger JH. Approaches for chronic disease prevention based on current understanding of underlying mechanisms. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;71:1710S-1714S.

Print Documents

www.TruePharmacyGrade.com    www.VitaminStarter.com

“Medical MV Tablets”® (Highly Absorbable, Pharmacy Grade, Vitamins, Minerals, and Antioxidants)

Dosage:  1-3 tablets twice a day

Why Medical MV Tablets by XT Medical?

·         Medical MV Tablets are produced in an FDA Audit Compliant facility

·         Medical MV Tablets contain the patented most useable form of folate called “Metafolin®”.  It is the natural best molecule of folate.  Unlike other isomers it can cross the blood brain barrier.  It is not harmful like folic acid

·         They are “True Pharmacy Grade”.  They are pure with no fillers or impurities

·         They contain a unique proprietary green food base made with organic vegetables and fruits.  It is our most comprehensive multivitamin and mineral supplement

·         The minerals are “chelated” or attached to natural amino acids so your body can absorb them

·         They contain natural Vitamin E and no harmful synthetic vitamin E (No d-l-alpha tocopherol)

·         Because foods are depleted, The American Medical Association recommends taking a multivitamin

·         Because recent research has found that ingredients in “cheap” vitamins may be harmful to your health

·         Your medical provider is not paid for recommending this product

Medical MV Tablets   #120 tablets      $39.90

Each ingredient has been selected in consideration of its absorbability, competitive relationship with other nutrients, allergenic potential, and long-term safety.

www.TruePharmacyGrade.com    www.VitaminStarter.com

“Probiotic-Medical”® (Probiotic that has a patented protection from stomach acid and bile)

Dosage:  1-2 capsules a day (Refrigerate after opening)

Why Probiotic Medical capsules by XT Medical?

·         Probiotic Medical has patented protection from stomach acid and bile

·         The patented process both shields and stabilizes the good flora

·         Probiotic Medical is produced in an FDA Audit Compliant facility

·         Probiotic-Medical is “True Pharmacy Grade”

·         Clinical analysis of many of the good bacteria in Probiotic Medical have been proven to bind to the intestine wall where they can live and thrive

·         Probiotic-Medical contains the #1 clinically studied probiotic strain

·         Probiotic-Medical contain prebiotic fructooligosaccharides (FOS).  It’s food for live flora

·         We use special stabilizers as well as “cryoprotect” these good bacteria with proprietary agents

·         Your medical provider is not paid for recommending this product

Probiotic-Medical #60 capsules $35.10

(Immune system boosters, Echadira®—3-4 capsules daily, NAC 750 Medical®—4 capsules daily)

www.VitaminStarter.com www.TruePharmacyGrade.com

Silver 404®

Topically 2-4 times a day and/or 2 tsp orally twice a day (adults) ½ tsp twice a day (children)

Here are some things Silver 404®can be used for:

Spray topically or saturate gauze and leave on the area for six minutes to one hour

· Open wounds

· Lacerations

· Infected areas of skin and mucosa

· MRSA (Staph) infections and other bacteria (see below)

· Sore throats

· Diabetic foot ulcers

· Fungal infections including Candida albicans

· Viral infections including H1N1

Bacterial infections including Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas, E. coli

Silver 404®

www.TruePharmacyGrade.com      www.VitaminStarter.com

Dosage:  Apply topically 2-4 times a day and/or 2 tsp orally twice a day (adults) ½ tsp twice a day (children 2 and up)

Summary

Clinical cases suggest that the patented molecules in Silver 404® enhances healing through the following actions:

·         Abolishes MRSA in humans.

·         Improves wound healing in severe HA-MRSA wounds.

·         Improves wound healing in severe third degree burns.

·         Controls infection in open wounds.

·         Improves speed of wound healing and decreases scarring in lacerations.

·         The moisture from applying Silver 404® allows greater cellular movement across the wound thus hastening the closure of a wound and reduces scarring.

·         Stem cell stimulation exists (revealed by calculation of granular tissue), as observed in the center of the wound (beyond the wound margins) Improved healing is significant.  It appears be due to reduced inflammation and improved immune function.

·         Silver 404 helps control unwanted bacteria, viruses and fungi. This appears to remove much of the work required by the immune system. This allows the immune mechanisms to perform their very specific tasks without opposition while preventing secondary infection resulting in faster wound healing, with less scarring.

·         Your medical provider is not paid for recommending this product

 Sore throats, diabetic foot ulcers, fungal infections including Candida albicans, viral infections including H1N1 and swine flu, Bacterial infections including Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas, and E. coli

References

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(UTSW), Marc Gillespie (CSHL), Peter E’dustacio (CSHL), Adolfo Garcï¿

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6. Laver WG, Webster RG. Selection of antigenic mutants of influenza viruses. Isolation and peptide mapping of their hemagglutination proteins.

Virology. 1968; 34:193–202.

7. Sleigh MJ, Both GW, Underwood PA, Bender VJ. Antigenic drift in the hemagglutinin of the Hong Kong influenza subtype: correlation of amino acid changes with alterations in viral antigenicity. J Virol. 1981; 37:845–853.

8. Fitch WM, Leiter JMF, Li X, Palese P. Positive Darwinian evolution in human influenza A viruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 1991; 88:4270–4272.

9. Bush RM, Fitch WM, Bender CA, Cox NJ. Positive selection on the H3 hemagglutinin gene of human influenza virus A. Mol Biol Evol. 1999; 16:1457–1465.

10. Rvachev LA. Computer modeling experiment on large-scale epidemic.

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11. Longini IM, Fine PE, Thacker SB. Predicting the global spread of new infectious agents. Am J Epidemiol. 1986; 123:383–391.

12. Bonabeau E, Toubiana L, Flahault A. The geographical spread of influenza. Proc Biol Sci. 1998; 265:2421–2425.

13. Grais RF, Ellis JH, Glass GE. Assessing the impact of airline travel on the geographic spread of pandemic influenza. Eur J Epidemiol. 2003; 19:1065–1072.

14. Viboud C, Bjørnstad ON, Smith DL, Simonsen L, Miller MA, et al. Synchrony, waves, and spatial hierarchies in the spread of influenza.

Science. 2006; 312:447–451.

15. Buonagurio DA, Nakada S, Parvin JD, Krystal M, Palese P, Fitch WM. Evolution of human influenza A viruses over 50 years: rapid, uniform rate of change in NS gene. Science. 1986; 232:980–982.

16. Fitch WM, Leiter JMF, Li X, Palese P. Positive Darwinian evolution in human influenza A viruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 1991; 88:4270–4272.

17. Fitch WM, Bush RM, Bender CA, Cox NJ. Long term trends in the evolution of H (3) HA1 human influenza type A. Proc Natl Acad Sci.

1997; 94:7712–7128.

18. Smith DJ, Lapedes AS, de Jong JC, Bestebroer TM, Rimmelzwaan GF, Osterhaus AD, Fouchier RA. Mapping the antigenic and genetic evolution of influenza virus. Science. 2004; 305:371–376.

19. Ferguson NM, Galvani AP, Bush RM. Ecological and immunological determinants of influenza evolution. Nature. 2003; 422:428–433.

20. Thompson WW, Shay DC, Weintraub E, Brammer L, Cox N, et al. Mortality associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in the United States. JAMA. 2003; 289:179–186.

21. Thompson WW, Shay DC, Weintraub E, Brammer L, Bridges CB, et al. Influenza-Associated hospitalizations in the United States.

JAMA. 2004; 292:1333–1340. 22. Ina Y, Gojobori N. Statistical analysis of nucleotide sequences of the hemagglutinin gene of human influenza A viruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 1994; 91:8388–8392.

23. Hay AJ, Gregory V, Douglas AR, Lin YP. The evolution of human influenza viruses. Phil Trans R Soc Lond B. 2001; 356:1861–1870.

24. Jenkins GM, Rambaut A, Pybus OG, Holmes EC. Rates of molecular evolution in NA viruses: a quantitative phylogenetic analysis. 2002; 54:156

–165.

25. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Update: influenza activity–United States and worldwide, 2006-2007 and composition of the 2007

–2008 influenza vaccine. MMWR. 2007; 56:789–794.

26. Roy, R. Ultradilute Material Research Innovations, Ag-aquasols with extradrdinary bactericidal properties: role of the system Ag-O-

H2O. 2007 vol 11 no 1.27. Pedersen, G., Effect of Prophylactic Treatment with ASAP –AGX-32 and nd ASAP Solutions on an Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Infecrion in Mice.

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29. De Souza. A., Mehta, D, Bactericidal activity of Combinations of Silver

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30. Leavitt, R, Pedersen G, Resistance of Silver Sol and Bacteria: A Discussion, ABL, 2009.

31 Viridis BioPharma, Probiotic Bacteria and Silver Sol, 2007.

32. Laver WG, Webster RG. Selection of antigenic mutants of influenza viruses. Isolation and peptide mapping of their hemagglutination proteins.

Virology. 1968; 34:193–202.

33. Sleigh MJ, Both GW, Underwood PA, Bender VJ. Antigenic drift in the hemagglutinin of the Hong Kong influenza subtype: correlation of amino acid changes with alterations in viral antigenicity. J Virol. 1981; 37:845–853.

34. Fitch WM, Leiter JMF, Li X, Palese P. Positive Darwinian evolution in human influenza A viruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 1991; 88:4270–4272.

35. Bush RM, Fitch WM, Bender CA, Cox NJ. Positive selection on the H3 hemagglutinin gene of human influenza virus A. Mol Biol Evol. 1999; 16:1457

–1465. 36. Rvachev LA. Computer modeling experiment on large-scale epidemic. Dokl USSR Acad Sci. 1968; 2:294–296.

37. Longini IM, Fine PE, Thacker SB. Predicting the global spread of new infectious agents. Am J Epidemiol. 1986; 123:383–391.

38. Bonabeau E, Toubiana L, Flahault A. The geographical spread of influenza. Proc Biol Sci. 1998; 265:2421–2425.

39. Grais RF, Ellis JH, Glass GE. Assessing the impact of airline travel on the geographic spread of pandemic influenza. Eur J Epidemiol. 2003; 19:1065–1072.

40. Viboud C, Bjørnstad ON, Smith DL, Simonsen L, Miller MA, et al. Synchrony, waves, and spatial hierarchies in the spread of influenza.

Science. 2006; 312:447–451.

41. Buonagurio DA, Nakada S, Parvin JD, Krystal M, Palese P, Fitch WM. Evolution of human influenza A viruses over 50 years: rapid, uniform rate of change in NS gene. Science. 1986; 232:980–982.

42. Fitch WM, Leiter JMF, Li X, Palese P. Positive Darwinian evolution in human influenza A viruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 1991; 88:4270–4272.

43. Fitch WM, Bush RM, Bender CA, Cox NJ. Long term trends in the evolution of H (3) HA1 human influenza type A. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 1997; 94:7712–7128.

44. Smith DJ, Lapedes AS, de Jong JC, Bestebroer TM, Rimmelzwaan GF, Osterhaus AD, Fouchier RA. Mapping the antigenic and genetic evolution of influenza virus. Science. 2004; 305:371–376.

45. Ferguson NM, Galvani AP, Bush RM. Ecological and immunological determinants of influenza evolution. Nature. 2003; 422:428–433.

46. Koelle K, Cobey S, Grenfell B, Pascual M. Epochal evolution shapes the phylodynamics of interpandemic influenza A (H3N2) in humans. Science. 2006; 314:1898–903.

47. Rambaut A, Pybus O, Nelson MI, Viboud C, Taubenberger JK, et al. The genomic and epidemiological dynamics of human influenza A virus. Nature April 16; [Epub ahead of print]48.Lavenu A, Leruez-Ville M, Chaix ML, Boelle PY, Rogez S, Freymuth F, Hay A, Rouzioux C, Carrat F. Detailed analysis of the genetic evolution of influenza virus during the course of an epidemic. Epidemiol Infect. 2005:1–7.

49. Nelson MI, Simonsen L, Viboud C, Miller MA, Taylor J, et al. Stochastic processes are key determinants of the short-term evolution of influenza A virus. PLoS Pathog. 2006; 2:e125. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.0020125.

50. Viboud C, Alonso WJ, Simonsen L. Influenza in tropical regions.

PLoS Med. 2006; 3:e89. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0030089.

51. Nelson MI, Simonsen L, Viboud C, Miller MA, Holmes EC. Phylogenetic analysis reveals the global migration of seasonal influenza A viruses.

PLoS Pathog. 2007; 3:e131. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.0030131.

52. Russell CA, Jones TC, Barr IG, Cox NJ, Garten RJ, et al. The global circulation of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Science. 2008; 320:340–346.

53. Holmes EC, Ghedin E, Miller N, Taylor J, Bao Y, et al. Whole

-genome analysis of human influenza A virus reveals multiple persistent lineages and reassortment among recent H3N2 viruses. PLoS Biol.

2005; 3:e300. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0030300.

54. Nelson MI, Viboud C, Simonsen L, Bennett RT, Griesemer SB, et al. Multiple reassortment events in the evolutionary history of A/H1N1 influenza A virus since 1918. PLoS Pathog. 2008; 4:e1000012. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1000012. 55. Nelson MI, Holmes EC. The evolution of epidemic influenza. Nat Rev Genet. 2007; 8:196–205.

56. Thompson WW, Shay DC, Weintraub E, Brammer L, Cox N, et al. Mortality associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in the United States. JAMA. 2003; 289:179–186.

57. Thompson WW, Shay DC, Weintraub E, Brammer L, Bridges CB, et al. Influenza-associated hospitalizations in the United States. JAMA. 2004; 292:1333–1340.

58. Ina Y, Gojobori N. Statistical analysis of nucleotide sequences of the hemagglutinin gene of human influenza A viruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci.

1994; 91:8388–8392.

59. Hay AJ, Gregory V, Douglas AR, Lin YP. The evolution of human influenza viruses. Phil Trans R Soc Lond B. 2001; 356:1861–1870.

60. Jenkins GM, Rambaut A, Pybus OG, Holmes EC. Rates of molecular evolution in NA viruses: a quantitative phylogenetic analysis. 2002; 54:156–165.

61. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Update: influenza activity–

United States and worldwide, 2006-2007 and composition of the 2007–2008 influenza vaccine. MMWR. 2007; 56:789–794.

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www.TruePharmacyGrade.com  or www.VitaminStarter.com

Medical MV Tablets 1-2 pills twice a dayWhole food chelated minerals, vitamins, antioxidants.  Science based
Probiotic-Medical 1-4 capsules per day15 Billion Strains per capsule coated patented protection from stomach acid
Omega 3 Medical 1-4 capsules a dayFish oil, pure pharmacy grade, DHA, EPA
5-HTP 1-2 pills a dayAmino acid that for neurotransmitters such as serotonin
ALA-Medical 2 pills a daySupports liver health, immune system, circulation, vision, glucose metabolism also heart and neurological health
ALC 500-Medical 1-3 pills a dayNerve and circulatory function, memory loss, brain function.  Boosts testosterone when used with ALC 500-medical.  This is a must for people who drink alcohol to protect the brain
Calcium-Medical with Boron 3-4 pills a dayA complex of calcium & magnesium
Coenzyme Q10 1-3 pills a dayNeurological, cognitive, immune and cardiac health.  Blood pressure,  a Statin drug must
CP 250-Medical 1 pill a dayBlood sugar levels, promotes lean muscle tissue
D3-Medical 1 a dayHeart, arteries immune system, bones, glucose
DHEA 1-2 a day in the morningPrecursor to other hormones, almost every component of the body. DHEA counters the stress hormone cortisol
Echadira 1 to 4 capsules dailySupport for immune system responsiveness against bacterial and viral invasion
Glucosa Med Mortar 3 capsules dailyBuilds cartilage.  Glucosamine sulfate in complex with proanthocyanidins (OPCs small enough to get into collagen fibrils). Decreases inflammation
GABA 1 a day or 1 pill twice a daybrain neurotransmitter, pituitary gland –growth hormone, sleep cycles, and body temperature
HawBio 1-3 a dayHawthorn has been shown in studies to dilate coronary blood vessels, helps blood pressure (it reduces blood vessel constriction).  Normalizes heart rate, has diuretic effects
INDY 3 Take 1-2 capsules daily (For men and women)Dietary indole compounds found in broccoli, and other cruciferous vegetables exert a strong protective effect on tissues such as breast, cervix, and prostate. Indole compounds favorably influence steroid hormone metabolism and help re-balance to a favorable estrogen metabolite
Iron Amino-Medical 1-2 a dayPatented, nutritionally functional iron amino acid chelate (iron bis-glycinate) high bioavailability, excellent tolerability, and low toxicity
L-Theanine 1-2 a dayPure L-theanine is produced through a patented manufacturing process. Studies show it can stimulate alpha brain wave activity and promote relaxation without drowsiness
LA 700-Medical 1-9 dailyCardiovascular system.  Involved in circulation via nitric oxide. Stimulates growth hormone, helps your body make its own creatine for muscles energy reserve. Promotes athletic performance. Necessary for insulin and glucagon.  Supports a healthy immune response.  Helps neuropathy
LC 500-Medical 1-3 a dayAn amino acid necessary for fatty acid metabolism and energy production in cardiac and skeletal muscle.  Studies have shown LC 500-Medical along with ACL 500-Medical helps boost testosterone
Lutein 1-2 a dayNaturally occurs in the macula of the eye.  As an antioxidant, it quenches harmful free radicals, helping keep the eye healthy
Mag Amino-Medical 1-2 dailyMagnesium attached to an amino acid so the body easily absorbs it.  Magnesium plays an essential role in more than 300 enzymes.  Magnesium is essential for all biosynthetic processes, for protein synthesis, and muscle function.
Melatonin 1-3 at nightInsomnia, tinnitus
NAC 750-Medical 1-4 dailyStops mucous production.  A precursor to glutathione one of the most powerful antioxidants in the body. (detoxification of heavy metals like mercury)  N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) has been extensively researched for its antioxidant properties it even neutralizes the chemical by-products of smoking and  pollution.
Niacinate-400-Medical 1 dailyLower blood lipids and cholesterol levels
Phosfora 1-4 a day Phosphatidylcholine(PC) Brain is 30% PC.  PC also forms joint lubrication. PC is also for the Intestine, heart and liver
Pycnogenol 1-4 dailyPowerful antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, lowers high blood pressure, prevents heart disease
Vita HC Chewable   Children age 4 and over: Chew 2  a day.   Adults: Chew 2 tablets, twice daily.Medical grade vitamin and mineral for children or adults
Silver 404 Spray topically 5-6 times a day Adults 2 tsp twice a day Children ½ tsp twice a dayPatented, 4 silver atoms attached to 4 oxygen atoms.  Studies found it kills MRSA and improved healing times in wounds.  It Can also be sprayed in the throat to help kill infections or swallowed. 
  

        www.TruePharmacyGrade.com  or www.VitaminStarter.com

Research Summary and References

Case Study on Wound Healing with the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404

Wound healing can be complicated by infection and inflammation. With less inflammation and infection wounds close quicker with less scaring.  In a research study, multiple cases were reviewed and documented for the purpose of recording improved wound healing with the use of the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404. Daily use resulted in reduced infection (including MRSA), and less inflammation. This significant review of the healing process strongly advocates that the molecules in Silver 404 help to disinfect the wound, prevents further infection, helps reduce inflammation and stimulates stem cells.  The outcome of the study was improved wound healing reduction in inflammation, enhanced angiogenesis, and reduced scarring.

Four cases were measured and assessed for wound healing, infection control and stem cell action.  The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 were used multiple times each day to help yield remarkable healing in:

·         A complex MRSA infected wound.

·         Serious facial lacerations including the prevention of inflammation and infection.

·         A serious burn in a patient with a compromised immune system. 

·         A severe complex infection. (bollous pemphigoid)

The studies revealed enhancements in healing times.  Some wounds healed in less than half the normal healing time. The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 produced remarkable healing results in the MRSA infected wound by eradicating the bacteria and helping to close a wound that had been open and infected for over a year.

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 helped produce remarkable healing in a serious facial laceration.  It prevented infection, and significantly reduced inflammation.  The results were an extremely rapid healing wound with little scaring.

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 were sprayed on a serious third degree burn in an 88 year old immune compromised patient.  The molecules helped to prevent infection and improved closure in a very difficult burn wound in approximately two months.

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 helped in healing of a bullous pemphigoid wound.  Re-epithelializaton was demonstrated along with stem cell function in closing the very serious wound.

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 and MRSA

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 has been shown to destroy bacteria, viruses and mold in vitro and living systems (23). Staphylococcus aureus can be completely destroyed by Silver 404 in as little as two minutes and in vitro studies show it will stay dead for 28 days (24). Rustum Roy Ph.D. reported that strains of resistant staph (MRSA) could be destroyed by the Silver 404 treatment in vitro (25). The University of Cal Berkely reports that the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 can completely destroy in vitro forms of MRSA (Methicillin resistant staph aureus) and VRE (Vancomyocin resistant Enterococcus) at levels as low as 2.5 ppm in as little as 45 to 60 minutes (26). With MRSA continuing to mutate and sustain resistance to antibiotics, it is encouraging to report the findings from this study which demonstrate an all-natural opponent to this modern day serious infection.

This study demonstrates the benefits of the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 on human subjects with serious MRSA infections of the skin. These patients were hospitalized and contracted their MRSA infections while staying in the hospital. Patients wound size, depth and closure rates were photographed and digitized for weekly calculations that quantified the time to wound closure and overall seriousness of the infection. Before, during and after photos demonstrate a visual accounting of the benefit of the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 treatment. All treatments were given by the hospital medical staff where patients received Silver 404 sprayed topically on the wound twice daily and orally ingested 2 teaspoons of the silver and oxygen molecules found in liquid Silver 404 twice a day.

The results of this study indicate that twice-daily treatment with the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 (spray form) and twice-daily oral ingestion of liquid silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 significantly improved treatments of hospital acquired MRSA infections in human subjects. The average time to closure improved, and patients taking the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 reported a significant reduction in pain associated with the wound.

Silver 404 Prevents Microorganisms From Becoming Resistant

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 was compared to several antibiotics against numerous bacterial strains to determine if Silver 404 could destroy the microbes and control mutation better than antibiotics. Silver 404 and the following antibiotics were tested: Oflaxacin, Tetracycline, Penicillin G, and Cefaperazone. The microbial strains tested include: S. gorondii, S. mutans, S. pyogenes, E. coli, S. pneumoniae, S, typhimurium, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, S. faecalis, Shigella and Staph aureus. The broth macrodilutiion susceptibility test was used to determine a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the silver hydrosol and antibiotic concentrations.

  • The 10 ppm Silver 404 inhibits MRSA.
  • The 10 ppm Silver 404 is the minimum inhibitory concentration.

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 Completely Destroys Disease Causing Yeast and Bacteria in Minutes

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 was tested against numerous bacterial and yeast strains (Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli) to determine how well The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 would kill a broad spectrum of disease causing pathogens. This was measured by percent reduction in pathogen, LOG reduction. Results indicate that the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 completely destroyed all forms of bacteria tested to a LOG 5 reduction. This is significant because an FDA category one wound care approval requires the approved product to be able to achieve a 1 log reduction (90% kill) in 7 days of contact, and a 3 log reduction (99.9% kill) within 14 days. The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 achieved a 4-5 log reduction (99.999+ kill) in the first hour of contact. The FDA further requires an approved product to be able to kill 500,000 bacteria. The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 was tested at 3-5 times the required amount of the pathogenic load, killing between 1,500,000 and 2, 500,000 of the deadly pathogens within the first hour.

In this study the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 far surpassed FDA required kill percentages by killing all yeast and bacteria tested at a significant level of 99.99900 %. This is an improvement of over 10,000 times (log 5) better kill rates than what would be required to be classified as an effective antimicrobial. It accomplished this killing in less than one hour.

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 appears to be one of the best and most broad spectrum antibacterial agents and has been proven to produce no resistance (Current Science, 91: 2008). Because the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 kills so quickly and completely (99.99900 %) without causing bacterial resistance, it could be successfully used every day without creating the problems of mutation and resistance created by antibiotics.

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 Improves Hospital Associated Wound Care

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 has anti-bacterial, antiviral and anti-fungal properties. Silver 404 has unique mechanisms of action that promote wound healing by preventing infection and promoting stem cell release and activation (Nexus, 2008).

The purpose of this study is to review the results of nursing homes using the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 for pressure sores infected with MRSA. This study reviews wound care data provided from nursing homes in several states including Wisconsin which used the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 on pressure sores infected with MRSA, and compared them to the national average. The percent of long stay, high-risk patients who have pressure sores were recorded and compared to the national average on a monthly basis.

Results from the nursing homes using the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404, report a significant reduction in the occurrence of pressure wounds as compared to the national average. This 40% reduction in the occurrence of wounds includes MRSA infections, arterial, diabetic, injury, pressure sores, skin tears, surgical wounds, and venous wounds.

Case Study Results

Case Study #1: Complicated MRSA Resolution & Wound

Healing

Subject: Female with infected mastectomy

Wound: Complicated MRSA Infection (determined by sample, incubation and microscopy).

Treatment:

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 given topically 4 times a day.

Results: Photo series demonstrates complete resolution in five weeks.

Day 21: Wound totally closed and 95% healed, MRSA gone.

Conclusion: The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 destroys HA-MRSA and promotes healing in a stubborn antibiotic resistant wound.

Case Study #2:

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 Used To Prevent Infection and Help Improve Wound Healing.

Subject: A 47 year old male in good health.

Wound: Traumatic injury with serious laceration to the eye and forehead. 18 stitches over the eye and ten in the forehead were required to close the 2.5 inch long lacerations. The orbital bone was broken and a serious hematoma developed on both eyelids and the bridge of the nose.

Treatment: The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 were given orally two teaspoons twice a day and given topically 4 times a day.

Conclusions:

The topical application of the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 kills pathogens and helps protect the wound from becoming contaminated or infected which means that the inflammatory phase of wound healing received significant assistance possibly by reducing the need for macrophages, monocytes and fewer cytokines producing less inflammatory response hormones. The fact that there is less inflammation suggests that there is a significant reduction in the inflammatory phase of healing. Since the silver oxygen molecules destroys bacteria, viruses and mold the wound was not infected thus reducing the need for phagocytosis, which reduces the immune cascade required for clotting and decontamination of the wound. The elimination of bacteria leaves the wound edges and margins clean and capable of optimal healing. In addition there is an increased ability to secrete stem cells, which will produce multi-potent cellular healing. This produces obstacle free wound healing making a cleaner healing scar. This can be seen in the fact that the wound was closed and stitches removed by day three where the wound presented a very low amount of inflammation, with no bacterial contamination. This could help explain why there is very little scarring. This could also be due to the fact that with less inflammation, there is less need for the platelets to produce histamine, cytokines and prostaglandins, which results in less overall swelling which means the wound can heal faster due to the fact that there are less factors competing with collagen. This reduced inflammation results in more collagen filling the fibrin – fibronectin matrix producing less tension, better bridging to migrate across the wound and less constriction (fibrotic scarring of the wound). In addition the gel provides a wound that is moist promoting the migration of polymorphonuclear cells stretching across the wound, which can lay the foundation of a healthy uncomplicated wound. In addition it appears that stem cell activation (as published in Nexus 2008), could be responsible for the rapid adhesion of the laceration and assist in the removal of the scab and reduction of the scarring. This could occur because the endothelialization had less opposition from bacteria, mold and inflammation. It appears that stem cells had activated and mobilized angiogenesis from the healthy blood vessels as evidenced by the pink coloration of the tissues immediately surrounding the suture lines which indicate that stem cell activated angiogenesis had taken place with remarkable results probably due to the fact that there was no bacterial infection nor any contamination and its associative inflammation.

In short the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 appears to play a significant role to decontaminate, prevent infection and stimulate stem cells resulting in improved wound healing characterized by reduced inflammation, improved angiogenesis, more efficient phagocytosis and reduced scarring. Since there is less need for polymorphonulclear cells there will be less helper T cells secreteting cytokines which cause the multiplication of inflammatory factors. This means there is less clean-up of inflammation and the wound in general. In addition there will be better stem cell production from the healthy fringes of the blood vessels, better collagen production and improved circulation due to the fact that vasodilation and blood vessel permeability will be normalized sooner in an uninfected and less inflamed wound. All of these parameters seem to have one thing in common; Silver oxygen molecules has antimicrobial abilities that help reduce infection, and inflammation resulting in better healing. Since inflammation lasts as long as there is debris or infection in the wound, it can be said that silver oxygen molecules can help remove the cause of a significant amount of infection and inflammation. This results in improved healing outcomes by reducing the pathogenic burden on the immune system allowing optimal restorative and regenerative immune functions.

Case Study #3

Infection Control In a Serious Third Degree Burn.Subject: 88 year old woman

Wound: Third degree burn over both thighs with potential pseudomas aeruginosa, and

MRSA infections.

Treatment: The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 sprayed on topically once a day when bandages were

changed. Results: Photos illustrate total healing in 65 days.

Conclusion:

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 prevents infection in a very large and exposed area. A wound this size would normally require skin grafting, but with the activation of stem cells re-epithelialization can regenerate healthy tissue across the wound. Evidence suggests this is what has happened in this case.

Case Study #4

Epithelialization of Wound With Bollous Pemphigoid.

Subject: 48 year old male.

Wound: MRSA infection (determined by sample, incubation and microscopy) with

bollous pemphigoid (autoimmune) complication.

Treatment: Silver 404 liquid given orally two teaspoons twice a day and silver 404 sprayed on topically once a day when bandages were changed. Results: MRSA infection controlled, autoimmune attack on tissues controlled and epithelializatioin of wound helps heal and close the wound.

Day One: Wound developed bollous pemphigoid (autoimmune)

Before treatment with the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404

Four days after treatment with the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404

Ten Days After treatment with the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404

Note islands of epithelialization (indicating stem cell activity).

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 has the ability to keep the wound moist, control infection, help stimulate stem cells and improve the healing outcome in this serious autoimmune complication. The photographs illustrate how the wound is healing from the margins and concurrent stem cell activity in the center of the wound is producing epithelialization and tissue regeneration even in areas where the margins of the skin do not directly contact the open wound.

Summary

The observations of these cases suggest that the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 enhances healing outcomes through the following actions:

1. Destroys MRSA in human subjects.

2. Improves wound healing in ongoing serious HA-MRSA wounds.

3. Improves wound healing in serious third degree burns.

4. Controls infection in open wounds.

5.  Improves wound healing times and reduces scarring in a serious laceration.

6.  The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 keeps the wound moist allowing greater cellular migration across the wound thus accelerating the closure of a wound and reduction of scarring.

7.  Stem cell activation is present (determined by quantification of granular tissue), as observed in the center of the wound (beyond the wound margins) where re-epithelialization produced improved healing. It is remarkable to have a serious autoimmune wound heal so quickly and may be due to the reduction in inflammation and improved immune function modulated through the use of the silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404.

8.  Stem cell activation and production must have occurred as seen in the after photo which clearly illustrates discoloration of the scar but leaves no adverse scarring, pulling or adhesions on the surface of the wound. This is remarkable since most wounds of this nature would have required skin grafting to close the wound.

The silver and oxygen molecules found in Silver 404 helps control unwanted bacteria, viruses and fungi which removes much of the workload from the immune system. This allows the immune components to perform their very specialized tasks without opposition while preventing secondary infection resulting in faster wound healing, with less scarring.

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